maryjanemk:

She cleans up nicely.
aestheticgoddess:

Pushwanger
n0hemian:

☼  
thedandyunderworld:

Probably one of the best costumes from the con that I’ve seen.
skindeeptales:

Felipe Tattooer
hiding-myself:

depression blog
"I think I fall in love a little bit with anyone who shows me their soul. This world is so guarded and fearful. I appreciate rawness so much."Emery Allen (via 5000letters)

111,815 notes

vivelafat:

shortwings:

ajamae:

faintedincoils:

lovelykeba:

Help the fight against police brutality!

You should definitely do this, but please be safe and knowledgeable about it! Here are some resources for how to safely film/photograph police brutality, as well as information on YOUR rights as you do so:
7 Rules for Recording Police
Know Your Rights: Photographers
Tips for Recording Police Interactions
Please be aware that different states have different laws on the matter.  Check into them so you can know you specific laws, and what to expect if you film the police.  Also check with your state’s chapter of the ACLU; many of them have tips on this matter, and some have pocket foldouts of your rights that you can use to convince the police that no, you aren’t doing anything wrong.

Stay woke.

There’s an app by the New Jersey ACLU called Police Tape that not only lets you record video and audio discreetly, but the data is backed up in the ACLU servers, meaning you will retain a copy of the recording should your phone be confiscated or destroyed.
Despite the laws in some states, The Supreme Court says you have the right to record police, and so does the Department of Justice.
I’d appreciate if you reblogged this, to get the word out.

Stay woke.